but with the satellite technology mitchell works on, frustrations like this quickly become obsolete.‘‘you’ll always be picked up at the right spot,’’ she says.mitchell would like to change the perception that careers in space technology are limited to life as an astronaut.‘‘the space sector is significantly wider than a lot of people think. you can be anyone using satellite imagery or satellite positioning technology in a location-based service app, through to someone building satellite hubs or designing a rocket,’’ she says.for her part, mitchell works in the ’downstream’ space sector, dealing with the users of space technology. she’s currently using her training as an engineer to work on dozens of projects testing satellite positioning across australia and new zealand.‘‘engineers have a good, logical way to solve problems, it’s a very important background,’’ mitchell says.another person who is dedicating his days to the space sector, csiro’s dr dave williams, agrees that there are plenty of options for those interested in a space-oriented career.dr david williams is the former ceo of the uk space agency.the former ceo of the uk space agency and former chairman of the european space agency is now is the executive director of csiro’s national facilities and collections. he says new space industry jobs exist in areas like nanotechnologies and data analytics, and of course there’s continuing demand for scientists, engineers and software e...