nearly 80 genes that could be linked to depression have been discovered by scientists.the findings could help explain why some people may be at a higher risk of developing the condition, researchers say. the study could also help researchers develop drugs to tackle mental ill-health, experts say.depression affects one in five people in the uk every year and is the leading cause of disability worldwide. life events - such as trauma or stress - can contribute to its onset, but it is not clear why some people are more likely to develop the condition than others.scientists led by the university of edinburgh analysed data from uk biobank - a research resource containing health and genetic information for half a million people. they scanned the genetic code of 300,000 people to identify areas of dna that could be linked to depression. some of the pinpointed genes are known to be involved in the function of synapses, tiny connectors that allow brain cells to communicate with each other through electrical and chemical signals. the scientists then confirmed their findings by examining anonymised data held by the personal genetics and research company 23andme, used with the donors' consent.the study, published in nature communications, was funded by wellcome as part of stratifying resilience and depression longitudinally, a £4.7 million project to better understand the condition. professor andrew mcintosh of the university of edinburgh's centre for clinical brain sciences, who leads...