the study entitled `long term extension of a randomised controlled trial of probiotics using electronic health records` led by researchers in the swansea university medical school and the college of human and health sciences, was published in scientific reports.the findings demonstrate the potential of using anonymised routinely collected electronic health records, such as those linked in sail, for more complete trial results. results showed that sail can help track trial participants, with long term monitoring of medical interventions and health outcomes, and new insights into population health.typically, rcts are relatively short term, and due to costs and resources, have limited opportunity to be re-visited or extended which means the effects of treatments cannot be scrutinised beyond the duration of the study, typically 1-2 years. with patients' consent, data analysts can match patients to their records and access data quickly. as a result, the cost of follow-up using routine data is potentially relatively small and does not increase with the number of participants. the original rct investigated the impact of probiotics taken during pregnancy on childhood asthma and eczema in a group of children at 6 months and then 2 years of age. professor sue jordan of swansea university's college of human and health science who led the study said: `in this study we reported on the feasibility and efficiency of electronic follow up, and compared it with traditional trial follo...