in this photo taken thursday, feb. 2, 2017, yvonne felix wears esight electronic glasses and looks around union square during a visit to san francisco. the glasses enable the legally blind to see. felix was diagnosed with stargardt's disease after being hit by a car at the age of seven. (ap photo/eric risberg)jeff regan was born with underdeveloped optic nerves and had spent most of his life in a blur. then four years ago, he donned an unwieldy headset made by a toronto company called esight. suddenly, regan could read a newspaper while eating breakfast and make out the faces of his co-workers from across the room. he's been able to attend plays and watch what's happening on stage, without having to guess why people around him were laughing.`these glasses have made my life so much better,` said regan, 48, a canadian engineer who lives in london, ontario.the headsets from esight transmit images from a forward-facing camera to small internal screens—one for each eye—in a way...