credit: shutterstockmore than 16m patient records were stolen from healthcare organisations in the us and related parties in 2016. that year, healthcare was the fifth most targeted industry when it came to cyber-attacks. and earlier this year, britain's national health service was crippled by a ransomware attack that locked up the computers holding many of its records and booking systems. but it's not just health data and services that are at risk from cyber-attacks – it's also human lives. in 2007, the then us vice-president, dick cheney, had his implanted heart defibrillator modified in order to avoid `death by hacking`, a technology weakness that us officials warned of again just recently. any medical device connected to a network is potentially at risk from being taken over and exploited by hackers, from mri machines to electric wheelchairs.as connected technology becomes even more embedded in healthcare, this cyber-threat is only likely to grow. but if we want to protect our health from cyber-attacks, we shouldn't fear technology. instead, we need to understand it better and realise that the threat becomes much worse when people make simple mistakes.what is the risk to healthcare?the most common cyber-threats to healthcare are data theft attacks. they typically start from something like a phishing attack. for example, if you are a doctor with access to patients...