in the last few years, calls for marijuana to be researched as a medical therapy have increased. it may be time for us to consider the same for psychedelic drugs.two general classes of such drugs exist, and they include lsd, psilocybin, mescaline and ecstasy, or mdma. researchers say it may be time to consider psychedelic drugs to be researched as a medical therapy. photo: jon han/new york timesall are illegal in the most countries because they carry a high risk of abuse. they can also cause harm. the best-known adverse event is persistent flashbacks, though these are believed to be rare. more common are symptoms like increased heart rate and blood pressure, anxiety and panic.some people have pointed to anecdotal evidence of positive effects. ayelet waldman, a us novelist and former federal public defender, wrote a memoir about how microdosing of the drugs turned her life around. but these drugs - like all drugs - carry risks that should not be ignored. with plenty of potential downsides, and no proven upsides, it's not surprising that such drugs have been shunned.in recent years, however, research has begun to show promise in treating a number of ailments.people with life-threatening illnesses can also suffer from anxiety, which is hard to treat, especially when patients are on many other medications. in 2014, a small randomised controlled trial was published that examin...