Laxaro Your source for the latest research news
 collapsing star gives birth to a black hole
collapsing star gives birth to a black hole

Astronomers have watched as a massive, dying star was likely reborn as a black hole. It took the combined power of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), and NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes to go looking for remnants of the vanquished star, only to find that it disappeared out of sight.

collapsing star gives birth to a black hole

Astronomers have watched as a massive, dying star was likely reborn as a black hole. It took the combined power of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), and NASA's Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes to go looking for remnants of the vanquished star, only to find that it disappeared out of sight.
It went out with a whimper instead of a bang.
The star, which was 25 times as massive as our sun, should have exploded in a very bright supernova. Instead, it fizzled out--and then left behind a black hole.
"Massive fails" like this one in a nearby galaxy could explain why astronomers rarely see supernovae from the most massive stars, said Christopher Kochanek, professor of astronomy at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Eminent Scholar in Observational Cosmology.
As many as 30 percent of s

star in closest orbit ever seen around black hole

Astronomers have found evidence of a star that whips around a likely black hole twice an hour. This could be the tightest orbital dance ever seen by a black hole and a companion star in our own Milky Way galaxy.

this star orbits a black hole once every half hour

Using a couple of NASA telescopes, researchers with Michigan State University have found what may end up being the closest orbit ever discovered between a star and a black hole. This binary system is located about 14,800 light-years from Earth in what is known as 47 Tucanae, a globular cluster of stars. Within this system, data indicates, is a white dwarf orbiting so closely to a black hole that its material is being pulled from it and onto a ‘disk of matter’ before being sucked in entirely.Much of the data was obtained using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, which indicates that the white dwarf is orbiting around a black hole every 28 minutes, or about twice per hour. What will ultimately happen to this star isn’t clear, but researchers don’t currently believe it will meet its fate at the

star discovered in closest known orbit around black hole

IMAGE: Astronomers have found evidence for a star that whips around a black hole about twice an hour. This may be the tightest orbital dance ever witnessed for a black hole...
view more Credit: Courtesy of NASAEAST LANSING, Mich. - Astronomers have found evidence for a star that whips around a black hole about twice an hour. This may be the tightest orbital dance ever witnessed for a black hole and a companion star.Michigan State University scientists were part of the team that made this discovery, which used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as well as NASA's NuSTAR and the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The close-in stellar couple - known as a binary - is located in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, a dense cluster of stars in our galaxy about 14,800 light years away from Earth.
Wh

vanishing star hints at direct collapse to black hole

Enlarge/ First you see it, then you don't.NASA, ESA, and C. KochanekShare this storyThe rules for a stellar death seem pretty simple. If the star isn't that massive, it burns out into a carbon-rich remnant called a white dwarf. If it's big enough, the star ends in a bang, exploding in a supernova that can leave behind a neutron star or a black hole. But a number of simulations have suggested that there's another option: big stars that go out not with a bang but a whimper.The idea is that, rather than exploding, much of the mass of the star falls inward to the core, forming a larger black hole. While some of the outer layers of the star are shed and it brightens briefly, there's no catastrophic explosion. Now, researchers about to publish in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

star in closest orbit ever seen around black hole

An artist's impression of a white dwarf star (left) in orbit around a black hole and so close that much of its material is being pulled away. Inset is an observation of the host globular cluster, 47 Tucanae, captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The system (known as X9) is indicated by the arrow, and low, medium, and high-energy X-rays are coloured red, green, and blue respectively. Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/University of Alberta/A.Bahramian et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss.Astronomers have found evidence of a star that whips around a likely black hole twice an hour. This could be the tightest orbital dance ever seen by a black hole and a companion star in our own Milky Way galaxy.
This discovery was made using two of NASA's space-based telescopes, the Chandra X-ray Observato

hubble dates black hole's last big meal

For the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy, it's been a long time between dinners. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has found that the black hole ate its last big meal about 6 million years ago, when it consumed a large clump of infalling gas. After the meal, the engorged black hole burped out a colossal bubble of gas weighing the equivalent of millions of suns, which now billows above and below our galaxy's center.

white dwarf flies around a black hole every 28 minutes

Enlarge/ Artist's conception of the black hole in 47 Tucanae X9 siphoning matter off the white dwarf. NASA/CXC/M.WeissShare this storyIn a study based on new observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory, NuSTAR and Australia Telescope Compact Array, a team of researchers may have confirmed the presence of a black hole and a white dwarf star in the tightest orbit ever seen.The system was observed in the 47 Tucanae globular cluster, is located about 16,700 light-years away in our own galaxy, and is the second-brightest globular cluster in the night sky. It’s also the site of the recent discovery of the first intermediate-mass black hole yet found. It’s a fertile ground for studying the role of black holes in globular clusters.The system in question, 47 Tuc X9, is the brightest X-ray sourc

white dwarf x9 is closest star found orbiting a black hole at astonishing 12 mil

Evidence has been discovered of a star orbiting a black hole at just 2½ times the distance between the Earth and moon.Astronomically speaking, at a million kilometres, that's very, very close. Boaty McBoatface is realVideo duration00:59Previous slideNext slideVideo duration01:05Black hole and white dwarf in cosmic danceBlack hole and white dwarf in cosmic danceScientists have discovered the closest ever orbit between a black hole and a companion white dwarf star on the outskirts of the Milky Way galaxy.
Boaty McBoatface is realVideo duration00:59Video duration00:59Boaty McBoatface is realBoaty McBoatface is realAn unmanned submarine, christened Boaty McBoatface after a public vote to name a polar research ship backfired, is being sent on its first Antarctic mission.UNSW robotics team comp

hubble telescope finds black hole shot out of a distant galaxy

"We estimate that it took the equivalent energy of 100 million supernovae exploding simultaneously to jettison the black hole," said Stefano Bianchi of Roma Tre University, co-author of the study announcing the phenomenon. According to their theoretical model, gravitational waves generated by two other black holes merging 1-2 billion years ago might have sent the supermassive one hurtling spaceward.The researchers had noticed that the black hole's energetic signature, known as a quasar, was located far from its expected place at the center of its home galaxy, named 3C186. It had already moved 35,000 light-years away, the team calculated, which is farther than our Sun's distance from the center of the Milky Way. The supermassive black hole continues to move at 7.5 million kilometers per hou

astronomers pursue renegade supermassive black hole

Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/NRAO/D.-C.Kim; Optical: NASA/STScI; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.WeissSupermassive holes are generally stationary objects, sitting at the centers of most galaxies. However, using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, astronomers recently hunted down what could be a supermassive black hole that may be on the move.
This possible renegade black hole, which contains about 160 million times the mass of our Sun, is located in an elliptical galaxy about 3.9 billion light years from Earth. Astronomers are interested in these moving supermassive black holes because they may reveal more about the properties of these enigmatic objects.This black hole may have "recoiled," in the terminology used by scientists, when two smaller supermassive black holes c

vla reveals new object near supermassive black hole in famous galaxy

Pointing the Very Large Array (VLA) at a famous galaxy for the first time in two decades, a team of astronomers got a big surprise, finding that a bright new object had appeared near the galaxy's core. The object, the scientists concluded, is either a very rare type of supernova explosion or, more likely, an outburst from a second supermassive black hole closely orbiting the galaxy's primary, central supermassive black hole.

hubble detects supermassive black hole kicked out of galactic core

IMAGE: The galaxy 3C186, located about 8 billion years from Earth, is most likely the result of a merger of two galaxies. This is supported by arc-shaped tidal tails, usually produced...
view more Credit: NASA, ESA, and M. Chiaberge (STScI/ESA)An international team of astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the centre of the distant galaxy 3C186. The black hole was most likely ejected by the power of gravitational waves. This is the first time that astronomers found a supermassive black hole at such a large distance from its host galaxy centre.Though several other suspected runaway black holes have been seen elsewhere, none has so far been confirmed. Now astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Teles

gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

Astronomers have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the center of a distant galaxy by what could be the awesome power of gravitational waves.

astronomers piece together first image of black hole

After training a network of telescopes stretching from Hawaii to Antarctica to Spain at the heart of our galaxy for five nights running, astronomers said Wednesday they may have snapped the first-ever picture of a black hole.

breaking the supermassive black hole speed limit

IMAGE: This is a quasar growing under intense accretion streams.
view more Credit: Los Alamos National LaboratoryLOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 21, 2017--A new computer simulation helps explain the existence of puzzling supermassive black holes observed in the early universe. The simulation is based on a computer code used to understand the coupling of radiation and certain materials."Supermassive black holes have a speed limit that governs how fast and how large they can grow," said Joseph Smidt of the Theoretical Design Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory, "The relatively recent discovery of supermassive black holes in the early development of the universe raised a fundamental question, how did they get so big so fast?"Using computer codes developed at Los Alamos for modeling the

insensitive gravitational wave detectors improved using clever addition

EnlargeNASAShare this storyThe detection of a black hole merger through gravitational waves signaled the opening up of new ground in astronomy. Until that moment, astronomers had only one way to observe the Universe: via the electromagnetic spectrum. It is hoped that gravitational waves will let us see further back in time and deeper into general relativity than ever before.The first generation of gravitational wave detectors, which are able to detect spatial movement on the order of 10-21m, are the finest and most sensitive listening devices ever made. And now they are listening for black hole mergers.Unfortunately, in practice, the current generation of gravitational wave detectors is a bit like your granddad. No, they are not deaf, but you still need to shout to get their attention. Or,

researchers discover star in closest known orbit around black hole

An international team of astronomers has observed evidence of a star that whips around a black hole at a rate of nearly twice an hour. If confirmed, the finding could demonstrate the tightest orbital dance between a black hole and a companion star ever seen.The study is scheduled to appear in an upcoming issue of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society and is now available online.The discovery was made using the collective power of three of the most advanced X-ray and radio telescopes in existence - NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory; NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), which observes higher-energy X-rays; and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), a state-of-the-art set of six radio telescopes operated by the Astronomy and Space Science Division of the Co

astronomers pursue renegade supermassive black hole

Supermassive holes are generally stationary objects, sitting at the centers of most galaxies. However, using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, astronomers recently hunted down what could be a supermassive black hole that may be on the move.

alma captures explosive star birth

Star birth can be a violent and explosive event, as dramatically illustrated in new ALMA images.

hubble dates black hole's last big meal

IMAGE: Main illustration shows the light of several distant quasars piercing the northern half of the Fermi Bubbles, an outflow of gas expelled by our Milky Way galaxy's hefty black hole....
view more Credit: NASA, ESA, and Z. Levy (STScI)For the supermassive black hole at the center of our Milky Way galaxy, it's been a long time between dinners. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has found that the black hole ate its last big meal about 6 million years ago, when it consumed a large clump of infalling gas. After the meal, the engorged black hole burped out a colossal bubble of gas weighing the equivalent of millions of suns, which now billows above and below our galaxy's center.The immense structures, dubbed the Fermi Bubbles, were first discovered in 2010 by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Tele

astronomers may have taken the first photo of a black hole

The Event Horizon Telescope is an array of powerful radio observatories around the world. When connected, they turn into one virtual telescope as big as the planet with a diameter of 6,200 miles. The scientists pointed those powerful radio telescopes to two tiny points in the sky: one of them is Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole in the center of our own galaxy, while the other is the black hole in the center of a nearby galaxy called M87. Team member Heino Falcke from Radboud University in Nijmegen, The Netherlands, said "even if the first images are still crappy and washed out, [they] can already test for the first time some basic predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity in the extreme environment of a black hole." The photo "will turn black holes from some mythical object to

rogue one honest trailer: 'expensive plot hole fix'

Rogue Onejust became the latest Star Wars film to get the honest trailer treatment.After poking fun at how the movie is really just a rehash of previous galaxy-far-far-away installments, the Screen Junkies team dubbed the standalone a $200 million attempt to fix one of the saga's biggest loopholes — the unexplained flaw in the Death Star."Get ready for Disney's first Star Wars anthology movie, because there's no way in hell they'd call it Star Wars Prequel 4," the narrator jokes as an image of the prequel trilogy appears, adding, "in what has to be the most money anyone has every spent to fill in a plot hole."Watch the video above.

guns n' roses cover 'black hole sun' for chris cornell at irish castle: watch vi

Kicking off the latest leg of their Not In This Lifetime Tour on Saturday (May 27), Guns N’ Roses honored the life of late Soundgarden singer Chris Cornell with a performance of the band's classic hit "Black Hole Sun" in front of a sold-out crowd of 80,000 at Ireland’s Slane Castle."This one's for you Chris. Black Hole Sun. Live from Slane, Ireland," the band's Twitter shared moments after the performance.Earlier in the week, Norah Jones also covered "Black Hole Sun," performing the Superunknown classic at Detroit's Fox Theatre, the same venue where Cornell played his final show. Incubus, Bush, Ryan Adams and other artists have also remembered the singer with the song during their concerts in the days since his death.Cornell was laid to rest Friday (May 26) at a private memorial at Hollywo

Search Tags
главная тайна азиатского турне путина andy wright hulu nabs five discovery channels for its live tv line up plaza convention prime digital cross surcingles best new playlists shows and exclusives on apple music that airbnb presstv iraqi kurdistan election voter list looks suspicious vivo nex announced full screen powerhouse ученые выяснили как определить возраст по капле крови i t dept attaches 11 bank accounts department chair civil engineering zijlstra claimed competition policy like shapes gmail users can now receive 50 mb email attachments plasma physics samsung galaxy s8 launch has surprises in store kylie jenner’s snaps of kim kardashian contouring her face will haunt you that garcia hurricane florence’s effects felt in morehead city nc astronomers shed light on formation of black holes and galaxies blue monday why unhappiness is good for you mental health analgesic drug 2010 plane crash zone values dozens injured after ryanair flight makes emergency landing andrew forrest donated his daughter sophia forrest s inheritance and she couldn t be happier linkno sugar added with biotin кейт миддлтон не хочет беременеть в третий раз из за растущей популярности меган маркл nuclear envelope мария максакова вынуждена выплачивать долги убитого мужа 8ghz4x cortex a republican lawmaker urges fcc to delay net neutrality repeal vote curious young weltman says “eye trunk” depuis juin
Facebook Twitter Google Plus Digg Share This

All rights reserved. © Laxaro 2016-2017 Run in 0.088 seconds