Laxaro Your source for the latest research news
 new structural studies reveal workings of a molecular pump that ejects cancer drugs
new structural studies reveal workings of a molecular pump that ejects cancer dr

Sometimes cells resist medication by spitting it back out. Cancer cells, in particular, have a reputation for defiantly expelling the chemotherapy drugs meant to kill them. Researchers at The Rockefeller University have shed new light on a molecular pump that makes this possible, by determining its three-dimensional structure, down to the level of atoms.

new structural studies reveal workings of a molecular pump that ejects cancer dr

The anatomy of the pump's pocket for carrying cargo (highlighted in blue) explains how this molecular machine is able to grab and eject a wide range of substances, including cancer drugs. Credit: Ella Maru StudioSometimes cells resist medication by spitting it back out. Cancer cells, in particular, have a reputation for defiantly expelling the chemotherapy drugs meant to kill them. Researchers at The Rockefeller University have shed new light on a molecular pump that makes this possible, by determining its three-dimensional structure, down to the level of atoms.
"This molecular machine ejects numerous anticancer agents, as well as other drugs. However, no one understood how it can recognize and remove such an impressive variety of substances," says lead researcher Jue Chen, the William E

new structural studies reveal workings of a molecular pump that ejects cancer dr

IMAGE: The anatomy of the pump's pocket for carrying cargo (highlighted in blue) explains how this molecular machine is able to grab and eject a wide range of substances, including cancer...
view more Credit: Ella Maru StudioSometimes cells resist medication by spitting it back out. Cancer cells, in particular, have a reputation for defiantly expelling the chemotherapy drugs meant to kill them. Researchers at The Rockefeller University have shed new light on a molecular pump that makes this possible, by determining its three-dimensional structure, down to the level of atoms."This molecular machine ejects numerous anticancer agents, as well as other drugs. However, no one understood how it can recognize and remove such an impressive variety of substances," says lead researcher Jue Chen, t

soy may help breast cancer patients to live longer

Maximilian Stock Ltd.—Getty ImagesThere is perhaps no more complicated and fraught connection between cancer and food than the one between breast cancer and soy.When studies first revealed that women in Asian countries who eat a significant amount of soy daily were less likely to die of breast cancer or experience recurrence than women who consumed less soy, many took it to mean that soy-based foods may have protective qualities. Other studies, meanwhile, found that soy may interfere with anti-cancer drugs, while others suggested that certain properties in soy mimic estrogen—which can fuel some breast cancers—and should therefore be avoided.There's been plenty of back and forth, but new research helps to clear up the confusion. In the latest study on the subject, researchers led by Dr. Fan

a multidrug efflux pump in motion

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have mapped the conformational changes that occur in a protein "notorious" for pumping chemotherapeutic drugs out of cancer cells and blocking medications from reaching the central nervous system.

two migration proteins boost predictive value of pancreatic cancer biomarker

IMAGE: This is Ann Killary, Ph.D.
view more Credit: MD Anderson Cancer CenterAdding two blood-borne proteins associated with cancer cell migration increases the predictive ability of the current biomarker for pancreatic cancer to detect early stage disease, a research team from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reports in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.The trio of biomarkers, tested in three separate cohorts, including two blinded validation studies, improved the detection of patients with early stage disease compared to healthy or benign disease controls."Adding these two biomarkers provided statistically significant improvement for all early stage cancer versus healthy controls as well as other subcohorts when used with the current gold standard biomarker,

genetic analysis better explains how uterine cancers resist treatment

Researchers have charted the complex molecular biology of uterine carcinosarcoma, a rare and aggressive gynecologic cancer, according to a study published on March 13 in Cancer Cell. Using this new collection of genomic information, physicians will be better able to determine the specific genetic fingerprint of each patient's tumor and to find treatment options that better suit them, says lead study author Douglas A. Levine, MD, director of the division of gynecologic oncology at NYU Langone Medical Center's Perlmutter Cancer Center.He and his colleagues found that while all uterine carcinosarcoma (UCS) tumors share some genetic traits, there is great diversity among the tumors. Instead of having a few commonly mutated genes, UCS tumors were found to have mutations (changes in DNA) in gene

unexpected oxidation state for molecular plutonium discovered

Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory in collaboration with the University of California - Irvine (UCI) have uncovered a significant new chemical attribute of plutonium, the identification and structural verification of the +2 oxidation state in a molecular system.

drug resistance of cancer cells crucially affected expression levels of abc-tran

How is drug resistance of cancer cells affected by ABC-transporters? A new research paper, published in the open access journal BioDiscovery, looks at the complex relationship between the second generation of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) - Dasatinib (DAS), and the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, ABCB1 and ABCG2, to assess whether these drug transporters might compromise therapeutic effect.Cancer enabled "targeted" treatment is an effective method with a minimal damage for healthy cells. Targeted therapy brought about a revolution in cancer treatment in the last decades by utilising rationally designed drugs that interfere with specific molecules (molecular targets) essential for proliferation and survival of malignant cells. While DAS represents excellent choice f

drug combination delivered by nanoparticles may help in melanoma treatment

The first of a new class of medication that delivers a combination of drugs by nanoparticle may keep melanoma from becoming resistant to treatment, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
CelePlum-777 combines a special ratio of the drugs Celecoxib, an anti-inflammatory, and Plumbagin, a toxin. With the drug, the cells have difficulty overcoming the effect of having more than one active ingredient.
Celecoxib and Plumbagin work together to kill melanoma cells when used in a specific ratio. Researchers used microscopic particles called nanoparticles to deliver the drugs directly to the cancer cells. These particles are several hundred times smaller than the width of a hair and can be loaded with medications.
"Loading multiple drugs into nanoparticles is one innovati

molecule stops fatal pediatric brain tumor

CHICAGO --- Northwestern Medicine scientists have found a molecule that stops the growth of an aggressive pediatric brain tumor. The tumor is always fatal and primarily strikes children under 10 years old. Every year, about 300 children under the age of 10 years old in the U.S. develop a tumor referred to as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). "This tumor kills every single kid who gets DIPG within one year. No one survives," said the study's first author, Andrea Piunti, a postdoctoral fellow in Shilatifard's lab in biochemistry and molecular genetics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.The study will be published February 27 in Nature Medicine."To the best of our knowledge, this is the most effective molecule so far in treating this tumor," said senior author Ali S

molecular structure of the cell nucleoskeleton revealed for the first time

Using 3-D electron microscopy, structural biologists from the University of Zurich succeeded in elucidating the architecture of the lamina of the cell nucleus at molecular resolution for the first time. This scaffold stabilizes the cell nucleus in higher eukaryotes and is involved in organizing, activating and duplicating the genetic material. Diseases such as muscular dystrophy and premature aging, caused by mutations in the lamin gene, the major constituent of the lamina, can now be studied more effectively.

biocon and others win drug battle in delhi high court

A two-judge bench of the Delhi High Court on March 3 lifted an earlier stay order of the same court on the issue of marketing and sale of generic drug biosimilar of Roche’s breast cancer drug ‘trastuzumab’ (group name). The appeal was filed by Indian pharma major Biocon and other pharmaceutical companies, including Biocon’s co-developer of the drug, Mylan.This drug is used for early gastric and breast cancer treatment. The bench of Justices BD Ahmad and Sanjeev Sachdeva heard the case and allowed the plaintiffs to also sell their drugs CANMAb and Hertraz, covering three types of cancers.The court had earlier restricted from manufacture and sale only one drug for one type of cancer, on a challenge by the Swiss drug-maker Roche. Roche’s ‘trastuzumab’ cancer drug has a brand name Herceptin. R

soy food consumption linked to prolonged survival in some breast cancer patients

New research indicates that dietary soy products are safe and even beneficial for women diagnosed with breast cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may help resolve controversies over soy's potential link to breast cancer outcomes.Soy foods are considered among the healthiest for human consumption, but their estrogen-like properties have raised concerns of a potential increased risk of breast cancer. This is because in hormone receptor-positive cancer, the most common form of the disease, there are some concerns that high estrogen levels help cancer cells grow and spread, though this remains controversial."Isoflavones--the component of soy that has estrogen-like properties--have been shown to slow the growth of breast

joe biden at sxsw: vows to work with donald trump on cancer

At the annual digital, music and entertainment festival in Austin, Tex., former Vice President Joe Biden described how his role in heading up the White House Moonshot on Cancer came about — from a comment he made to former President Obama that his only regret in not running for the presidency was that he would not be able to preside over the cure for cancer. Soon after, Obama put Biden in charge of the Moonshot, an ambitious program to accelerate new treatments for cancer and encourage more innovative research to discover novel ways of fighting the disease."Jill and I decided to devote the rest of our lives to this fight against cancer," Biden said at the Austin Convention Center as he described their personal reasons for wanting to see faster progress toward new therapies and even cures.

targeting a tumor trigger | eurekalert! science news

Heidelberg, 15 March 2017 - Many cancer patients that receive chemotherapy go into remission at first, but relapse after treatment is discontinued. There is increasing evidence that this is due to the presence of cancer stem cells -- cells that reproduce indefinitely and may seed new tumors. A research group from Milan, Italy, now devised a strategy to specifically target cancer stem cells in some cancers and reduce their tumor-generating potential. The results are published today in EMBO Molecular Medicine.Every tissue of our body has stem cells that continuously divide to replenish the body with new cells. In previous studies, the research team, headed by Pier Paolo Di Fiore and Salvatore Pece, investigated the role of a protein called Numb in maintaining stem cells in normal mammary gla

fluciclovine pet/ct improves radiotherapy targeting for recurrent prostate cance

IMAGE: CTVPOST (red) = CTVPRE (yellow) union CTVPET (pink). Also shown (upper right corner) are the PRE (square) vs POST (triangle) dose volume histograms for PTV1, PTV2, rectum, bladder, and penile...
view more Credit: Ashesh B. Jani, MD, and David Schuster, MD, Emory University.Reston, Va. (March 6, 2017) - The featured clinical investigation article of the March 2017 issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine demonstrates that the PET radiotracer fluciclovine (fluorine-18; F-18) can help guide and monitor targeted treatment for recurrent prostate cancer, allowing for individualized, targeted therapy."This is the first study of its kind demonstrating changes in post-surgery radiotherapy target design with advanced molecular imaging in recurrent prostate cancer, with no demonstrated incre

in battle for real estate, a disordered protein wins out

IMAGE: Professor Peter Wright, Professor Jane Dyson and Research Associate Rebecca Berlow led the study at The Scripps Research Institute. (Photo by Madeline McCurry-Schmidt.)
view more Credit: The Scripps Research InstituteLA JOLLA, CA - March 8, 2017 - Research findings that first had scientists scratching their heads have turned out to be "quite revolutionary," according to study leaders at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI).The scientists found that in a competition between two apparently equivalent proteins, one protein wins out every time as it swoops in to claim a cellular binding target. This protein is of special interest to researchers because it can trigger cancer cells to kill themselves. In fact, the researchers now hope future therapeutics that mimic this protein may wor

scientists stimulate immune system, stop cancer growth

A chemical found in tumors may help stop tumor growth, according to a new study.Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago report that increasing expression of a chemical cytokine called LIGHT in mice with colon cancer activated the immune system's natural cancer-killing T-cells and caused primary tumors and metastatic tumors in the liver to shrink.LIGHT is an immune-stimulating chemical messenger previously found to have low levels of expression in patients with colon cancer metastases.The results are published in Cancer Research.Colon cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related death in the U.S. and, despite advances in treatment, long-term survival of patients with liver metastases is rare."For most patients with colon cancer that has spread to the liver, current trea

lung cancer may go undetected in kidney cancer patients

IMAGE: (L to R): Dr. James Brugarolas, Dr. Isaac Bowman, Dr. Ivan Pedrosa, and Dr. Payal Kapur studied lung cancer tumors in kidney cancer patients.
view more Credit: UT SouthwesternDALLAS - March 7, 2017 - Could lung cancer be hiding in kidney cancer patients? Researchers with the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center's Kidney Cancer Program studied patients with metastatic kidney cancer to the lungs and found that 3.5 percent of the group had a primary lung cancer tumor that had gone undiagnosed. This distinction can affect treatment choices and rates of survival."Kidney cancer spreads primarily to the lungs making the detection of a primary lung cancer difficult. Lung cancer is typically more aggressive than kidney cancer. Undetected, lung cancer may spread and eventually kill

newly discovered vulnerability in an aggressive breast cancer provides therapeut

Triple-negative breast cancer quickly becomes resistant to current therapies, leaving patients no therapeutic options.
BIDMC researchers discovered that TNBC cells increase production of pyrimidine nucleotides in response to traditional chemotherapy.
Discovery represents a vulnerability that can be exploited by blocking pyrimidine using an existing inhibitor in combination with chemotherapy. BOSTON - Physicians currently have no targeted treatment options available for women diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer known as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), leaving standard-of-care chemotherapies as a first line of defense against the disease. However, most women with TNBC do not respond to these broadly-targeted chemotherapies, and those who do often develop resistance to

on the path toward molecular robots

The crystals repeatedly flip under a blue light. Credit: Hokkaido UniversityScientists in Japan have developed light-powered molecular motors that repetitively bend and unbend, bringing us closer to molecular robots.
Researchers around the world are trying to mimic cellular systems to develop molecular motors that can drive materials, including delivering drugs to target tissues. To this end, researchers must find ways to convert motion at the molecular level to motion at the macroscopic level. They also must find ways to cause chemical reactions to repeat autonomously and continuously.Yoshiyuki Kageyama, Sadamu Takeda and colleagues at Hokkaido University's department of chemistry have successfully created a chemical compound, called a crystalline assembly, which repeatedly flips under

how rats could lead to autism drugs that actually work

Clinical trials with mice have mostly failed, but the bigger, smarter rodents have more to reveal about human brains and behavior.

solid metal has 'structural memory' of its liquid state

This recovered bismuth sample has a rhombohedral structure and contains liquid structural motifs after deep melting at high pressures. The surprising structural memory effect in the molten state is responsible for the unexpected change from magnetic repulsion to magnetic attraction in bismuth. Credit: Yu Shu and Guoyin Shen.New work from a team including Carnegie's Guoyin Shen and Yoshio Kono used high pressure and temperature to reveal a kind of "structural memory" in samples of the metal bismuth, a discovery with great electrical engineering potential.
Bismuth is a historically interesting element for scientists, as a number of important discoveries in the metal physics world were made while studying it, including important observations about the effect of magnetic fields on electrical

researchers discover how breast cancer mutation in brca1 causes protein to self-

IMAGE: Deborah Kelly, a structural biologist with the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, explained how the BRCA1 gene loses its tumor-fighting potency.
view more Credit: David Hungate/Virginia Tech CarilionOf the more than 3 million people with breast cancer in the United Stated, about 10 percent carry an inherited mutation in their BRCA1 gene. In health, the gene is responsible for suppressing tumors. In disease, the gene goes terribly awry. Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute found that breast cancer cells can trigger the self-destruction of the tumor-suppressing BRCA1 proteins. They published their results today (5 a.m. Eastern Time, Tuesday, Feb. 28) in Scientific Reports, a Nature journal. "There are different ways in which DNA damage can be repaired.

Search Tags
border between bangladesh leicester should name stadium after sacked ranieri says mourinho blood is thicker than water for the common reed at least that s what the soil tells us harry bennetts billboard music awards 2017 performances which did you like best may my child pee in the park best iphone 8 plus wallet cases impressive craftmanship on display бэтмен против супермена в новом трейлере injustice 2 новости best android smartphones september 2017 bengaluru s embassy group partners with amazon to power smart homes berlin institut korg volca mix coming at 2018 namm show unofficial – synthtopia indoor fort тиллерсон похвалил конгресс нацдиалога в сочи который сша критиковали beauvoisin dans bb 8 s evil twin at 150 is here to help disney strike back these smart glasses automatically adjust to your eyes τραμπ το βράδυ της τρίτης η απόφαση για τα πυρηνικά του ιράν κόσμος professor vissel bay area join us 3 15 to talk about how we know climate change is real 5 things you missed this week the start of a self driving car ip war 1 step brain hacking and more get rich or die tryin 15th anniversary how many questions are in 50 cent s 21 questions barnaby joyce expecting baby with ex staffer reports famed hacker kevin mitnick shows you how to go invisible online 2017 vmas taylor swift drops music video for look what you made me do frank ocean sues producer om mas keith over blonde songwriting credits создан препарат против супербактерий 9 things to do in boulder county today feb 24 azadi slogans raised at ramjas should you bank your own blood actually yeah the vietnam war pow hal kushner and wife in life magazine why ellie brush was always made for afl women s success at the gws giants armed deputy who failed to enter florida school during massacre quits arsenal won’t sack wenger and courtois agent will ‘listen’ to real madrid say adios to the blackberry priv as it has hit its end of life best flight search νέα επεισόδια στο οακα ομάδα atlanta bound delta jet makes emergency landing in nigeria wben am buffalo astronomers see mysterious nitrogen area in a butterfly shaped star formation disk lawrence donald trump is collapsing trumpism is collapsing
Facebook Twitter Google Plus Digg Share This

All rights reserved. © Laxaro 2016-2017 Run in 0.057 seconds