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 new york schools help cornell monitor local waterways for invasive species
new york schools help cornell monitor local waterways for invasive species

Invasive aquatic species like round goby, Asian carp, and sea lamprey are a growing problem in New York State. Their presence impacts water quality, food supply, recreation and tourism, as well as human and animal health. Early detection is a critical first step in monitoring a species' spread and managing responses.

new york schools help cornell monitor local waterways for invasive species

Brooklyn students collect water samples to test for the presence of invasive species. Credit: Cornell UniversityInvasive aquatic species like round goby, Asian carp, and sea lamprey are a growing problem in New York State. Their presence impacts water quality, food supply, recreation and tourism, as well as human and animal health. Early detection is a critical first step in monitoring a species' spread and managing responses.
Scientists at Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine have devised genetic tests that can detect the environmental DNA (eDNA) of invasive species in a waterway before they become established there. But there are more than 7,600 freshwater lakes and ponds and over 70,000 miles of rivers and streams in New York State, all of them potential conduits for th

calls for volunteers to clean up canberra's polluted catchments

Canberrans are urged to swap their vacuum cleaners with rubbish pickers this Sunday to help clean up the city's polluted waterways.In the wake of a damning report by Clean Up Australia revealing the amount of rubbish in the city's waterways doubled in the 12 months since they were found to be the dirtiest in the country, the ACT government is calling on volunteers to take part in its inaugural Clean Up Your Catchment Day.
The National Capital Authority is calling on volunteers for Clean up your Catchment Day on Sunday. Front, National Capital Authority chief executive Malcolm Snow, and coordinator of Clean up your Catchment Michelle Jeffrey. Back, volunteers Rebecca Sorensen, and Anna Wong. Photo: Jamila Toderas Photo: Jamila ToderasThe push for the ACT to hold its own clean up day coinc

mating mix-up with wrong fly lowers libido for mr. right

First spotted in the US in the early 1980s, a sexually confused fruit fly called Drosophila subobscura may have contributed to a collapse in native fruit flies through misdirected mating attempts. Credit: Malcolm Storey, bioimages.org.uk/If you've ever suffered through a nightmare date and were hesitant to try again, fruit flies can relate.
Female fruit flies that have been coerced into sex by invasive males of the wrong species produce fewer offspring and are less likely to reproduce with their own kind, finds a new study.Invasive species are known to threaten native biodiversity by bringing in new diseases, preying on resident species, or outcompeting them for food or other resources. But this study shows invasives pose a risk through unwelcome romantic advances, too."We don't tend to

invasive and native marsh grasses may provide similar benefits to protected wetl

An invasive species of marsh grass that spreads, kudzu-like, throughout North American wetlands, may provide similar benefits to protected wetlands as native marsh grasses. According to new research from North Carolina State University, the invasive marsh grass's effects on carbon storage, erosion prevention and plant diversity in protected wetlands are neutral. The findings could impact management strategies aimed at eradicating the invasive grass.Phragmites australis, known as the common reed, is an invasive marsh grass that can spread at rates up to 15 feet per year. It thrives throughout North American wetlands, and studies have demonstrated that its densely packed growth pattern chokes out native marsh plants, thereby reducing plant diversity and habitat used by some threatened and en

11 of 27 reef fish species in hawaii are overfished

U.S. officials say the first-ever assessment of Hawaii's reef fish shows that 11 of 27 species are experiencing some level of overfishing.
Researchers with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center announced in a statement Monday that 11 species including ulua, five surgeonfishes, two goatfishes, and three parrotfishes are being overfished.Scientists say the most susceptible species are those that live the longest and are popular local food sources.NOAA officials say they collected information on fish size, maximum age, growth rates and maturity and compared the results with established guidelines to present fishery managers with options for future sustainability.Reef fish support local tourism and fishing economies and are important t

cursive is making a comeback: test your handwriting skills

Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Cursive writing is looping back into style in schools across the country after a generation of students who know only keyboarding, texting and printing out their words longhand.Alabama and Louisiana passed laws in 2016 mandating cursive proficiency in public schools, the latest of 14 states that require cursive. And last fall, the 1.1 million-student New York City schools, the nation's largest public school system, encouraged the teaching of cursive to students, generally in the third grade."It's definitely not necessary but I think it's, like, cool to have it," said Emily Ma, a 17-year-old senior at New York City's academically rigorous Stuyvesant High School who was never taught cursive in school and had to learn it on her own.Quiz: See If You Remember How to Wri

anti-safe schools flyers distributed around perth

Anti-Safe Schools pamphlets distributed to homes in across Perth have been branded 'dangerous' by WA LGBTI advocacy groups. WAtoday understand pamphlets have been delivered to homes in Gosnells, Huntingdale, Mandurah, Mount Lawley, Fremantle and Rossmoyne in the last four months, and detailed why the controversial Safe Schools program should not be implemented in WA.
The advertisement and the pamphlet. Some claims listed inside the pamphlet included:"Children are taught that they should not use the term "boys and girls" and being heterosexual is not the norm.""Safe Schools tells students they have two virginities, their first time with a boy and first time with a girl.""Safe Schools pressures children to celebrate homosexuality and transgenderism."AdvertisementThe flyer was also publishe

researchers discovered fungus gnat paradise in peruvian amazonia

IMAGE: Maneta aligera is one of the new fungus gnats discovered in the Peruvian Amazonia.
view more Credit: Olavi Kurina, University of Tartu, EstoniaFinnish and Estonian researchers have discovered and identified 16 new fungus gnat species in the Amazonia. The diverse gnat species maintain exceptionally rich parasitoid wasp species, which shows the importance of interdependence between rain forest species. Researchers from the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku, Finland, and from the University of Tartu, Estonia, found 16 new fungus gnat species of the genus Manota in the Allpahuayo-Mishana National Reserve in the Peruvian Amazonia. Fungus gnats are small insects whose larvae live inside mushrooms. - In addition to the new species unknown to science, we found several known fun

ancient reptile mystery solved as 2 extinct species found to be the same

Ichthyosaurs, which are similar-shaped to dolphins and sharks, but are reptiles, swam the seas for millions of years during the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. They were the first, large extinct reptiles brought to the attention of the scientific world. Dean Lomax, a palaeontologist and Honorary Scientist at The University of Manchester, working with Professor Judy Massare of Brockport College, New York, have studied thousands of ichthyosaur fossils and have delved through hundreds of years of records to solve an ancient mystery. Many ichthyosaur fossils were found in England during the early 19th century, but it was not until 1821 that the first ichthyosaur species was described - called Ichthyosaurus communis. This species has become one of the most well-known and iconic of al

ancient reptile mystery solved as 2 extinct species found to be the same

Artwork with 'bait ball' Ichthyosaur. Credit: Julio LacerdaIchthyosaurs, which are similar-shaped to dolphins and sharks, but are reptiles, swam the seas for millions of years during the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. They were the first, large extinct reptiles brought to the attention of the scientific world.
Dean Lomax, a palaeontologist and Honorary Scientist at The University of Manchester, working with Professor Judy Massare of Brockport College, New York, have studied thousands of ichthyosaur fossils and have delved through hundreds of years of records to solve an ancient mystery.Many ichthyosaur fossils were found in England during the early 19th century, but it was not until 1821 that the first ichthyosaur species was described - called Ichthyosaurus communis. This sp

study sheds new light on how species extinction affects complex ecosystems

Research by the University of Southampton has found that methods used to predict the effect of species extinction on ecosystems could be producing inaccurate results. This is because current thinking assumes that when a species vanishes, its role within an environment is lost too.

bird-slaying snakes ravage island forests too: study

The venomous brown treesnake can grow up to three metres in lengthA non-native snake species that has already wiped out most of Guam's tree-dwelling birds is also decimating the Pacific island's forests, researchers said Wednesday.
Growth of new trees on the US island territory may have dropped by as much as 92 percent due to the snake's presence, they reported in the journal Nature Communications.The findings show that the devastation wrought worldwide on island wildlife by invasive species—especially snakes, rodents and mosquitoes—may be far greater than previously suspected, the authors warned."The full impact of the brown treesnake invasion, and the loss of birds, is still unfolding," said Joshua Tewksbury, a professor at the University of Colorado and senior author of the study."But

reducing pressure on predators, prey simultaneously is best for species' recover

CORVALLIS, Ore. - Reducing human pressure on exploited predators and prey at the same time is the best way to help their populations recover, a new study indicates.The findings about synchronous recovery are important because historically about half the attempts at species restoration have amounted to a sequential, one-species-at-a-time tactic - usually the prey species first, then the predator.This study suggests that a synchronous approach almost always produces a recovery that is more rapid and more direct - faster than predator-first recovery and less prone to volatile population fluctuations than prey-first recovery. Just as crucial, synchronous is also better for the humans who earn a living harvesting the two species.Findings of the research were published today in Nature Ecology an

new frog from the peruvian andes is the first amphibian named after sir david at

Life male holotype of Pristimantis attenboroughi. Credit: Dr. Edgar LehrWhile there are already a number of species named after famous British broadcaster and naturalist Sir David Attenborough, including mammals, reptiles, invertebrates and plants, both extinct and extant, not until now has the host of the BBC Natural History's Life series been honoured with an amphibian.
A new fleshbelly frog, recently discovered in the Peruvian Andes, is formally described as Pristimantis attenboroughi, while commonly it is to be referred to as the Attenborough's Rubber Frog. The new species is published in the open-access journal ZooKeys.Scientists Dr. Edgar Lehr, Illinois Wesleyan University, and Dr. Rudolf von May, University of Michigan, spent two years (2012-2014) surveying montane forests in cent

research shows nature can beat back scientific tinkering with genes of entire sp

An artist's conception of a genetically altered mosquito gone rogue. A researcher at KU says it won't happen anytime soon. Credit: Kent Smith, University of KansasRest easy, folks. Armies of genetically modified super-species are unlikely to conquer Earth anytime soon.
In a paper recently appearing in the journal Genetics, a University of Kansas researcher and colleagues from Cornell University have revealed daunting challenges to changing the DNA of entire populations of species via the most promising techniques available today to produce "gene drive."For decades, scientists have proposed various methods of genetically altering natural populations to solve problems that plague human beings."A lot of times nature interferes with how humans would like the world to be," said lead author Ro

selective schools increasingly cater to the most advantaged students

Today thousands of Year 6 students will sit the selective schools test, hoping to gain entry to one of these top performing high schools. In 2016, selective schools made up eight of the top 10 schools in the Higher School Certificate  leaderboard.
Most students sitting for the selective schools test this week will be unsuccessful in securing a place. This is not surprising, as selective schools are government schools designed to cater for gifted and talented students with superior academic ability and high classroom performance.Unlike other government schools, they are unzoned, so students can apply regardless of where they live.But these public schools are increasingly bastions of inequality, rather than simply havens for the gifted and talented.Figures from the government’s MySchool we

most act primary schools fail to improve at national rate

Most Canberra primary schools failed to improve their students' literacy and numeracy at the same rate as other schools around Australia.And two government high schools' students actually had worse writing scores in year 9 than they did two years earlier when they were in year 7.
St Francis of Assisi Primary School students Rose Cochrane, Lucille Gregory, Jonathan Price and Max Read. The school was identified as making substantial improvements to students' results between years three and five. Photo: Jay CronanThe 2016 NAPLAN results of about 9500 Australian schools were released on the My School website on Wednesday.Fairfax Media analysed how ACT schoolchildren's results had improved since those same students were last tested in 2014.AdvertisementWhile 25 Canberra schools recorded gains

research shows nature can beat back scientific tinkering with genes of entire sp

IMAGE: An artist's conception of a genetically altered mosquito gone rogue. A researcher at KU says it won't happen anytime soon.
view more Credit: Kent Smith | University of KansasLAWRENCE -- Rest easy, folks. Armies of genetically modified super-species are unlikely to conquer Earth anytime soon.In a paper recently appearing in the journal Genetics, a University of Kansas researcher and colleagues from Cornell University have revealed daunting challenges to changing the DNA of entire populations of species via the most promising techniques available today to produce "gene drive."For decades, scientists have proposed various methods of genetically altering natural populations to solve problems that plague human beings."A lot of times nature interferes with how humans would like the worl

theresa may tells of - personal priority' to keep scotland in uk - this is local

With the union between Scotland and England under pressure in the wake of the Brexit vote, the Prime Minister will use a visit north of the border to highlight her commitment to "strengthening and sustaining the bonds that unite us". She will tell Nicola Sturgeon and the SNP that "politics is not a game", and accuse the Scottish Government of having neglected schools because of its "obsession" with independence.Start the conversation, or Read more at This is Local London.

best usb-c monitors for mac

What's the best USB-C monitor for Mac? Right now, it's more like what's available.Updated March, 2017: Added some new product informationUSB-C is the future. Transfer rates are lightning quick, it's easy to plug in, it can replace just about any cable under the Sun — what more could you need? The new MacBook Proonly has USB-C ports (Thunderbolt 3), so it's an awesome time to check out compatible monitors, since there are those that can power your MacBook Pro and even act as USB hubs, all through a single connection!Here are the best USB-C monitors you can buy right now:LG 27UD88This 4K monitor is hands-down the best USB-C monitor you can buy to complement your Mac experience. Via one cable, USB-C, you can power your MacBook, transfer video, and use the monitor as a USB hub, with the abilit

clown tree frogs—newly discovered and already threatened?

An international team of scientists discovered two new species of clown tree frogs in the Amazon region. Until recently, these colorful amphibians had erroneously been considered part of another species. Now, DNA studies and an analysis of the calls of the examined populations revealed a much higher diversity within this group of frogs. Due to their small distribution areas, it is likely that the newly discovered species are threatened, but the determination of their protection status is currently still pending. In their study, published today in the scientific journal PloS ONE, the scientists from six countries clearly show that a complete species inventory is only possible by means of international cooperation.

cross-species jumps may play unexpectedly big role in virus evolution

On occasion, a virus may jump from one host species to another and adapt to the new host. Such cross-species transmission happens more often than expected, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, and it may play a much bigger role in virus evolution than previously thought.

flowering times shift with loss of species from a grassland ecosystem

Wildflowers (Sisyrinchium, Eschscholzia, Lasthenia, Muilla, and others) bloom on the experimental site at Coyote Ridge, California. Loss of species from the grassland made the remaining species flower earlier than usual. Credit: Amy WolfScientists have documented many cases in which the timing of seasonal events, such as the flowering of plants or the emergence of insects, is changing as a result of climate change. Now researchers studying a grassland ecosystem in California have discovered that reducing the number of species in the system can also cause a significant shift in when the remaining species flower.
These kinds of changes are a concern because they can lead to mismatches in timing between species that depend on one another, such as plants that flower when their insect pollina

dutch to invest €10.7m in boosting international school places

The plan includes guidelines for teachers. Photo: Depositphotos.comThe economic affairs ministry and The Hague and Amsterdam city councils are to invest a total of €10.7m to create an extra 1,150 places at international schools.Half of the cash will come from central government and the rest from the local councils. According to the Parool, Amsterdam’s contribution is around €4m.The aim of the investment is to ensure that the Netherlands remains popular with international companies.‘Foreign firms are responsible for some 900,000 jobs. Good international education is an important factor for these firms in deciding where to locate,’ said economic affairs minister Henk Kamp. ‘The children of foreign workers are often dependent on international schools for their education.’The number of childre

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