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 pcsk9 inhibitor evolocumab reduces adverse cardiovascular events
pcsk9 inhibitor evolocumab reduces adverse cardiovascular events

PCSK9 Inhibitor Evolocumab Significantly Reduces Adverse Cardiovascular Events When Added to Statin Therapy With No Major Safety Concerns Data from the first successfully completed dedicated outcomes trial of a PCSK9 inhibitor show that, in patients with cardiovascular disease, evolocumab reduced LDL cholesterol by 59 percent and reduced the risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes with greater benefit the longer the duration of therapy.A new class of cholesterol lowering drugs known as PCSK9 inhibitors has emerged as an effective treatment for drastically lowering LDL cholesterol beyond what is possible with statin therapy alone. Previous research demonstrated that evolocumab, a member of this new class of drugs, effectively reduces LDL cholesterol by approximately 60 percent. The FOURIER

pcsk9 inhibitor evolocumab not associated with decline in memory or cognitive fu

New trial results show that in patients on statin therapy, the addition of evolocumab did not result in a significant change in cognitive function after 19 months of treatment.A new class of cholesterol lowering drugs, PCSK9 inhibitors, effectively lower LDL cholesterol levels beyond current treatment targets, and new research shows that these lower levels result in a reduction in adverse cardiovascular events, making these drugs attractive treatment options for patients who do not achieve their target cholesterol level with statin therapy alone. However, previous research had raised the possibility that a low level of LDL cholesterol and/or use of statins may negatively impact memory and overall cognition. New research led by the TIMI Study Group at Brigham and Women's Hospital in collabo

pcsk9 inhibitior bococizumab produces varying results

Bococizumab significantly reduces cardiovascular events in high-risk patients with high LDL cholesterol levels. Development of the drug was stopped after some patients experienced a reduction in cholesterol lowering over time. New results from the clinical trial program, SPIRE (Studies of PCSK9 Inhibition and the Reduction of Vascular Events), which sought to determine the effect of bococizumab, a PCSK9 inhibitor, on LDL cholesterol levels and clinical outcomes in high-risk patients already taking statin therapy, were presented at the 2017 American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions and simultaneously published in two manuscripts in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Researchers report that bococizumab had short-term benefits on lowering cholesterol levels and significantly redu

pcsk9 inhibition with bococizumab yields mixed results

In a clinical program that was terminated early, the experimental PCSK9 inhibitor bococizumab, when given on top of effective statin therapy, had widely varying effects on LDL cholesterol levels and had no benefit on cardiovascular events among those with LDL lower than 100 mg/dL. However, in patients at high cardiovascular risk who had baseline LDL of greater than 100 mg/dL, bococizumab significantly reduced the risk of cardiovascular events by 21 percent compared with placebo, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session. Pfizer, the trials' sponsor, announced on Nov. 1, 2016, that the company would discontinue development of bococizumab, citing an unanticipated attenuation of LDL lowering over time, as well as evidence of an immu

failed fertility therapy associated with increased risk of later cardiac disease

Women who undergo fertility therapy, but do not get pregnant, have a higher risk of developing long-term cardiovascular disease, compared with women who become pregnant, according to a new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal)."We found that two-thirds of women never became pregnant after being managed for fertility treatment and these women also had worse long-term cardiovascular risk, specifically higher risks of stroke and heart failure, compared with the remaining third of women who did become pregnant and delivered a baby," says Dr. Jacob Udell, lead author of the study, scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and cardiologist at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre and Women's College Hospital.There is a lack of data on the long-term healt

osteoporosis drug found safe in long-term trial

A new study provides reassuring information about the short-term and long-term safety of denosumab, a monoclonal antibody that is used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis. Adverse events that had been noted in a pivotal clinical trial in women age 60 to 90 years old treated for 3 years showed no tendency to increase after a further 3 years of treatment, the study showed. In addition, women who crossed over from 3 years of placebo to 3 years of denosumab experienced no increase in adverse effects compared with women treated for the initial 3 years. "All of this is consistent with an excellent safety and tolerability profile for denosumab treatment for osteoporosis," said Dr. Nelson Watts, lead author of the study results published in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. The authors noted

benefits of physical activity may outweigh impact of obesity on cardiovascular d

Sophia Antipolis, March 1, 2017: The benefits of physical activity may outweigh the impact of overweight and obesity on cardiovascular disease in middle-aged and elderly people, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.1 The observational study was conducted in more than 5,000 people aged 55 years and older who were followed-up for 15 years."Overweight and obesity is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and it is recommended to lose weight," said author Dr Klodian Dhana, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. "But in the elderly this is slightly different because weight loss, especially unintentional, is associated with muscle loss and death.

noninvasive imaging helps predict heart attacks

Noninvasive CT angiography and stress tests can help predict which patients are likely to suffer a heart attack or other adverse cardiovascular event, according to a new study appearing online in the journal Radiology.Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Bypass surgery or stent placement is often recommended in people with certain degrees of coronary arterial narrowing, or stenosis, but recent studies have shown that many of these patients do just as well with medical therapy. A key factor in treatment decisions is the hemodynamic significance of the lesion, meaning the degree to which the lesion is blocking blood from getting to areas of the heart. "Previous studies show that a lesion is hemodynamically significant if there is a significant blood pressure drop cor

new study finds potential breakthrough in determining who's at risk for heart at

Researchers are revisiting their views on the relative dangers soft and hard atherosclerotic plaque deposits pose to heart health. Findings of a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute may be a "game-changer" for determining who's at risk of a heart attack, they say.

The notion that soft plaque is more likely to rupture and cause heart attacks than hard calcium deposits in coronary arteries may be wrong, according to the new study that will be presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions in Washington D.C. on March 18.

Atherosclerosis is caused when plaque builds up in the arteries, narrowing and hardening them. "We previously thought the lipid-laden soft plaque was more likely to rupture and cause heart attacks, but based

new drug to lower cholesterol levels

The first rigorous test of an expensive new drug that radically lowers cholesterol levels found that it significantly reduced the chance that a high-risk patient would have a heart attack or stroke. These were men and women who had exhausted all other options. The results of the study, which cost about $1 billion and was paid for by Amgen, maker of the drug, were published Friday last in The New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology. The drug, Repatha, is called a PCSK9 inhibitor and can make cholesterol tumble to levels almost never seen naturally in adults, or even in people taking cholesterol-lowering statins. The Amgen drug and a similar one, sold by Sanofi and Regeneron, were approved by the Food and Drug Administration i

ammonia's role in cardiovascular health tracked in mice, human cells

IMAGE: This is William Durante, Ph.D., professor of medical pharmacology and physiology at the MU School of Medicine and lead author of the study.
view more Credit: Justin Kelley, MU HealthCoronary artery disease is caused by plaque buildup in the vessels that deliver blood to the heart. Narrowed or blocked coronary arteries can result in a heart attack or sudden cardiac death. A study at the University of Missouri School of Medicine revealed that ammonia plays an important role in maintaining cardiovascular health. Researchers say that non-toxic amounts of the gas could help prevent coronary artery disease."Endothelial cells make up the inner lining of blood vessels," said William Durante, Ph.D., professor of medical pharmacology and physiology at the MU School of Medicine and lead auth

critical thinking instruction in humanities reduces belief in pseudoscience

A recent study by North Carolina State University researchers finds that teaching critical thinking skills in a humanities course significantly reduces student beliefs in "pseudoscience" that is unsupported by facts."Given the national discussion of 'fake news,' it's clear that critical thinking - and classes that teach critical thinking - are more important than ever," says Anne McLaughlin, an associate professor of psychology at NC State and co-author of a paper describing the work."Fundamentally, we wanted to assess how intentional you have to be when teaching students critical thinking," says Alicia McGill, an assistant professor of history at NC State and co-author of the paper. "We also wanted to explore how humanities classes can play a role and whether one can assess the extent to

simple tool can predict serious adverse events in acute heart failure patients

DES PLAINES, IL--More than one million patients are admitted to the hospital with heart failure each year. A prospective clinical validation found the Ottawa Heart Failure Risk Scale (OHFRS) tool to be highly sensitive for serious adverse event in acute heart failure patients and can now be used in clinical practice to estimate the short-term risk of SAEs in acute heart failure patients. Further, when available, the prediction tool works even better when adding a simple blood test (NT-ProBNP). The OHFRS may therefore be useful to allow the safe discharge of patients with heart failure in the emergency department without hospital admission. That is the main finding of a study to be published in the March 2017 issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM), a journal of the Society for Academic

mount sinai to present clinical findings at american college of cardiology scien

(Washington, DC - March 17, 2017) - Physicians, fellows, and researchers from Mount Sinai Health System will present research updates and clinical findings at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Sessions in Washington, D.C., March 17-19, 2017.Mount Sinai cardiologists are available to comment on breaking news at the session. Additionally, Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, will be awarded the 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award by the American College of Cardiology in honor of his lifetime of contributions to the cardiovascular profession on Sunday, March 19.Significant scientific presentations and poster sessions include: Section 1261M-05- Predictive Values of the Ideal Cardiovascular Health and t

women less likely to have their heart health checked

A new report has highlighted a gender divide in the screening of patients for cardiovascular disease - Australia's number one killer.Research from The George Institute for Global Health and The University of Sydney found men were significantly more likely to have their heart disease risk factors measured by their GP.The study published in the journal Heart also found the odds of being treated with the appropriate preventative medicines were 37 per cent lower for younger women at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than their male counterparts.Associate Professor Julie Redfern, from The George Institute for Global Health, said the results were especially concerning because more women than men die each year from cardiovascular disease. Associate Professor Redfern said: "Unfortunately t

pokémon go events: here's what's next!

What's the next event for Pokémon Go? Here's what you need to know!Update: Pokémon Go has three major new features coming in 2017 — here's the tease from MWC!Pokémon Go is intended to get you out and about, both on your own and with family and friends. One of the ways Pokémon Go tries to bolster activity is with events. Some of the events get splashy announcements and coincide with big public holidays. Others are quieter and more regular.So far, events have only ever been announced a couple of days in advanced. Still, based on past events we can make some good guesses about future events, and we can also keep track of the behind-the-scenes events that don't get announced. In other words, bookmark this page and check back often!BREAKING: Pokémon Day Event| Pokémon Go Gen 2!New: Best evoluti

pokémon go events: here's what's next!

What's the next event for Pokémon Go? Here's what you need to know!Update: The next Pokémon Go nest migration is expected to occur at 7 p.m ET / 4 p.m PT on Wednesday, March 8, 2017 (midnight UTC on Thursday, February 9. 2017).Pokémon Go is intended to get you out and about, both on your own and with family and friends. One of the ways Pokémon Go tries to bolster activity is with events. Some of the events get splashy announcements and coincide with big public holidays. Others are quieter and more regular.So far, events have only ever been announced a couple of days in advanced. Still, based on past events we can make some good guesses about future events, and we can also keep track of the behind-the-scenes events that don't get announced. In other words, bookmark this page and check back

pokémon go events: here's what's next!

What's the next event for Pokémon Go? Here's what you need to know!Update: Snorlax, which was exclusive to Japan's Kumamoto region for almost two weeks as part of an effort to bolster tourism following last year's earthquake, has returned to the rest of the world. Happy hatching and catching!Update: The next Pokémon Go nest migration is expected to occur at 7 p.m ET / 4 p.m PT — or 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT if they don't switch to Daylight Saving Time — on Wednesday, March 23, 2017 (midnight UTC on Thursday, February 9. 2017).Pokémon Go is intended to get you out and about, both on your own and with family and friends. One of the ways Pokémon Go tries to bolster activity is with events. Some of the events get splashy announcements and coincide with big public holidays. Others are quieter and m

clinical trial supports use of novel preventive therapy for dangerous swelling d

clinical trial for a new drug to prevent attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE) - a rare disorder characterized by recurrent swelling of tissues in the face, hands, gastrointestinal tract and airway - has had promising results. In the February 23 New England Journal of Medicine, a multi-institutional team describes how subcutaneous injection of the monoclonal antibody lanadelumab every 14 days significantly reduced swelling episodes without serious side effects in HAE patients. "In this study we found that lanadelumab appears to be safe and well tolerated in HAE patients, and early data in a small number of patients suggests strong efficacy," says Aleena Banerji, MD, of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, corresponding and a lead autho

pokémon go events: here's what's next!

What's the next event for Pokémon Go? Here's what you need to know!Update: To help rejuvenate tourism, Snorlax is going to be easier to find in Japan's earthquake-struck Kumamoto region from March 4 to March 13, 2017. Details below!Pokémon Go is intended to get you out and about, both on your own and with family and friends. One of the ways Pokémon Go tries to bolster activity is with events. Some of the events get splashy announcements and coincide with big public holidays. Others are quieter and more regular.So far, events have only ever been announced a couple of days in advanced. Still, based on past events we can make some good guesses about future events, and we can also keep track of the behind-the-scenes events that don't get announced. In other words, bookmark this page and check

tata motors rolls out vrs, reduces hierarchy levels

Sohini Das  | 
Ahmedabad  March 14, 2017 Last Updated at 23:16 IST

google reduces jpeg file size by 35%

EnlargeHarry Langdon/Getty ImagesShare this storyGoogle has developed and open-sourced a new JPEG algorithm that reduces file size by about 35 percent—or alternatively, image quality can be significantly improved while keeping file size constant. Importantly, and unlike some of its other efforts in image compression (WebP, WebM), Google's new JPEGs are completely compatible with existing browsers, devices, photo editing apps, and the JPEG standard.The new JPEG encoder is called Guetzli, which is Swiss German for cookie (the project was led by Google Research's Zurich office). Don't pay too much attention to the name: after extensive analysis, I can't find anything in the Github repository related to cookies or indeed any other baked good.There are numerous ways of tweaking JPEG image quali

heart panel weighs in on top meal-timing questions

For the first time in its 93-year history, the American Heart Association has released a "scientific statement" on meal timing and frequency, and how they can affect weight and cardiovascular disease. The advisory committee behind the statement - a mix of physicians and nutrition researchers - note several reasons for the review's importance now. These include rising rates of obesity, heart disease and diabetes, as well as increased professional and popular interest in meal-timing topics.For example, is breakfast good or bad for health and weight control? Does fasting reduce body weight? Can it improve glucose control? What about calories consumed after dinner?
Breakfast: it's worth the effort. Photo: Stocksy"Americans have an around-the-clock lifestyle, so food consumption also occurs a

city guides coming to facebook app, suggests places & events, connects you to fr

Facebook is testing a City Guides feature in its iOS app. When you’re visiting a city, the feature points you to popular attractions, upcoming events and places locals visit – but with the friend focus you’d expect from Facebook. The app highlights places friends have visited, and events friends are attending …Amazon Prime, free delivery, free videosTNW first spotted the feature in testing last year, with others seeing it again now, suggesting a wider rollout.The app appears to proactively offer you the guide for a city you are visiting, while you have the option to pull up other guides manually.There are of course many apps offering this kind of functionality, but the emphasis on checking out places recommended by friends, as well as meeting up with them at events, does give Facebook’s ap

rbi says note-ban impact on gdp over

Post demonetisation, the RBI on Friday warned of a possible spike in inflation and stressed the need to make digital payments “safe and secure”, even as it felt that the adverse and transient impact on the economy has “by and large” dissipated already.In a preliminary assessment report on ‘Macroeconomic Impact of Demonetisation’, an RBI paper said Rs 1000/500 notes valued at Rs 15.6 trillion were demonetised, but the precise estimate of currency that returned to the banking system is not yet available as the reconciliation process is still on.“Hence, the adverse wealth effect on account of SBNs (specified bank notes of Rs 1000/500) not returning to the banking system could be assessed only after the reconciliation exercise is complete,” it said, while adding that the total net currency in

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