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 test reveals antibiotic resistant bacteria in a half hour
test reveals antibiotic-resistant bacteria in a half hour

The discovery of antibiotics in the early part of the 20th century changed modern medicine. Simple infections that previously killed people became easy to treat. Antibiotics' ability to stave off infections made possible routine surgeries, organ transplants, and chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer. But because of overuse and misuse, antibiotics are losing their effectiveness. Many species of bacteria have evolved resistance to commonly used antibiotics and multidrug-resistant bacteria--so-called superbugs--have emerged, plaguing hospitals and nursing homes. Last month, the World Health Organization issued a dire warning: The world is running out of antibiotics. A new test developed at Caltech that identifies antibiotic-resistant bacteria in as little as 30 minutes could help turn the

antibiotic nanoparticles fight drug-resistant bacteria

Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem, especially among a type of bacteria that are classified as "Gram-negative." These bacteria have two cell membranes, making it more difficult for drugs to penetrate and kill the cells.

nist's quick test may speed antibiotic treatment and combat drug resistance

NIST physicist Ward Johnson observes signals generated by bacteria coating quartz crystals, a novel method of sensing whether an antibiotic kills the bacteria. The new NIST technique senses mechanical fluctuations of bacterial cells and any changes induced by an antibiotic. With further development, the technique could hasten the identification of effective medical treatments in clinical settings and drug development. Credit: Burrus/NISTResearchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a potential new tactic for rapidly determining whether an antibiotic combats a given infection, thus hastening effective medical treatment and limiting the development of drug-resistant bacteria. Their method can quickly sense mechanical fluctuations of bacterial cell

novel antibiotic combination therapy overcomes deadly drug-resistant bacteria

Researchers have known that part of the challenge in treating penicillin-resistant infections lies in understanding the way bacteria inactivate penicillin antibiotics. The enzymes that do this, beta-lactamases, chop up the antibiotics rendering them useless. One particularly problematic group of bacterial beta-lactamases, metallo-beta-lactamases (MBLs), is able to destroy even the newest penicillins. MBLs are often made by bacteria alongside other enzymes, including other beta-lactamases that allow certain bacteria to destroy the entire penicillin arsenal. Now, researchers in Cleveland, Ohio have taken a significant step toward defeating antibiotic-resistant infections by combining two different antibiotics that each block a different kind of drug-destroying enzyme secreted by bacteria. Wh

superbug: new antibiotic may help fight drug resistance

Infections that are resistant to the drugs used to treat them, also known as superbugs, are a growing problem worldwide. If nothing is done, 10 million people are estimated to die each year from antibiotic resistance infections by 2050.Promoting the judicious use of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture is an important way to combat superbugs, but developing new antibiotics to treat infections is also critical. Although few pharmaceutical companies are currently developing new antibiotics, scientists from Rutgers University-New Brunswick report an important finding that could help lead to a new drug down the line. In the journal Cell, the researchers report they’ve discovered a new antibiotic called pseudouridimycin that appears to work well in animal models. The antibiotic comes from a

alternative antimicrobial compounds could come from wastewater

Municipal wastewater may become a key ally in the fight against antibiotic-resistant disease-causing bacteria and fungi, a new study at Stellenbosch University (SU) found."Certain bacteria in municipal wastewater produce antimicrobial compounds or biosurfactants that can help prevent the growth of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms which cause serious infections in humans," says Dr Thando Ndlovu a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Microbiology at SU. Ndlovu recently obtained his doctorate in Microbiology at SU under the supervision of Prof Wesaal Khan from the same department.He says the rapid increase in the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria was a major reason behind his search for new antimicrobial compounds. As part of his research, Ndlovu collected wastewater sampl

nist's quick test may speed antibiotic treatment and combat drug resistance

BOULDER, Colo.--Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a potential new tactic for rapidly determining whether an antibiotic combats a given infection, thus hastening effective medical treatment and limiting the development of drug-resistant bacteria. Their method can quickly sense mechanical fluctuations of bacterial cells and any changes induced by an antibiotic. Described in Scientific Reports, NIST's prototype sensor provides results in less than an hour, much faster than conventional antimicrobial tests, which typically require days to grow colonies of bacterial cells. Delayed results from conventional tests allow dangerous infections to progress before effective treatments can be found and provides a time window for bacteria to devel

drugs urgently needed to fight 'antibiotic resistant' superbugs: who

New drugs are urgently needed to fight the rise of superbugs, which are resistant to antibiotics, says the WHO. New antibiotics need to be developed urgently to combat 12 families of bacteria, the World Health Organization says, describing these "priority pathogens" as the greatest threats to human health.The United National health agency said many of these bacteria have already evolved into deadly superbugs that are resistant to many antibiotics.The bugs "have built-in abilities to find new ways to resist treatment" the WHO said, and can also pass on genetic material that allows other bacteria to become drug-resistant.Governments need to invest in research and development (R&D)if new drugs are to be found in time, because market forces cannot be relied upon to boost the funds needed to fi

antibiotic resistance: how to save the world from superbugs

Superbugs, or bacteria that have grown immune to the drugs used to treat them, are rapidly becoming a global public health crisis. In the United States alone, at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics, and at least 23,000 people die every year from those infections.Combating this problem is going to require a collaborative effort, according to antibiotic resistance experts at Fortune’s Brainstorm Health conference in San Diego. Here are three key ways medicine must change in order to keep antibiotics effective and superbugs from taking over.Use fewer antibioticsAbout half of the antibiotic use in healthcare settings is inappropriate, said Dr. Jean Patel, an antimicrobial resistance expert at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

mutants in microgravity

Bacteria may mutate more rapidly in space and scientists theorize patterns of those mutations could help predict how pathogens become resistant to antibiotics. Such predictions could, in turn, be used to develop new drugs to use against those pathogens. Antibiotic resistant pathogens or bacteria is a growing world-wide health concern. The long-term use of many common antibiotics has led to some diseases becoming resistant to drug therapy, which can lead to longer and more complicated illnesses.

bacteria and antibiotic resistance: superbugs are powerful

The stories are harrowing: people with simple cuts who get exposed to bacteria can end up with life-threatening, and sometimes even life-ending, infections. Antibiotics were supposed to prevent these infections and deaths. But in the U.S., about two million people become infected with bacteria that can’t be treated by antibiotics, and at least 23,000 people die from those infections every year.MORE:The World Is Not Ready for the Next PandemicThe bacteria behind these infections, once common. have mutated to become resistant to the dozens of antibiotics developed to wage war against them. (See exactly how that happens in the video above.) That's a problem of our own making. Public health experts say that the superbugs are the result of years of overusing and misusing antibiotics, either by

how to solve a problem like antibiotic resistance

There has been much recent talk about how to target the rising tide of antibiotic resistance across the world, one of the biggest threats to global health today. While there is no doubting the size of the problem facing scientists, healthcare professionals and the pharmaceutical industry, there are innovative ways we can target antibiotic resistance in the short term, which are discussed in three articles published in Essays in Biochemistry. With only a few antibiotics in development and a long drug development process (often 10-15 years), there is concern that what is being done to combat antibiotic resistance may be 'too little, too late'. "If bacteria continue developing resistance to multiple antibiotics at the present rate, at the same time as the antibiotic pipeline continues to dry

new ultrafast method for determining antibiotic resistance

Klebsiella pneumoniae growing in the microfluidic chip imaged in phase contrast. The bacteria are 0.003mm long and divide every 30 min. Credit: Özden Baltekina, et alResearchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method for very rapidly determining whether infection-causing bacteria are resistant or susceptible to antibiotics. The findings have now been published in the U.S. journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
Antibiotic resistance is a growing medical problem that threatens human health globally. One important contributory factor in the development of resistance is the incorrect use of antibiotics for treatment. Researchers therefore seek reliable methods to quickly and easily identify bacterial resistance patterns, known as antibiotic susceptibility

using experimental and computational methods, researchers reveal workings of bac

Central to understanding why bacteria become antibiotic resistant is knowing how bacteria respond to the drugs trying to kill them. In a new study, Boston College researchers report that antibiotics disrupt the genetic defensive responses in lethal bacteria.

killer antibiotic now 25,000× more potent—and resistant to drug resistance

EnlargeGetty | YURI CORTEZ Share this storyWith clever chemical tweaks, an old antibiotic can dole out any of three lethal blows to some of the deadliest bacteria—and give evolution one nasty concussion.The antibiotic, vancomycin, has always been a heavy hitter against odious germs; it uses one crafty maneuver that can take out even drug-resistant foes and is often used as a last resort. But, with three chemical modifications, reported this week in PNAS, the drug now has three distinct molecular moves to take out pathogens. The menacing modifications render vancomycin at least 25,000 times deadlier. And with that level of potency, dazed bacteria stumble at developing resistance when given the chance in lab experiments.And maybe that should be the real goal in the war against drug-resistant

the post-antibiotic era is here. now what?

When Alexander Fleming came back from a Scottish vacation in the summer of 1948 to find his London lab bench contaminated with a mold called Penicillium notatum, he kicked off a new age of scientific sovereignty over nature. Since then, the antibiotics he discovered and the many more he inspired have saved millions of lives and spared immeasurable suffering around the globe. But from the moment it started, scientists knew the age of antibiotics came stamped with an expiration date. They just didn’t know when it was.Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is both natural and inevitable. By the luck of the draw, a few bacteria will have genes that protect them from drugs, and they’ll pass those genes around—not just to their progeny, but sometimes to their neighbors too. Now, computational epide

decreasing antibiotic use can reduce transmission of multidrug-resistant organis

NEW YORK (March 8, 2017) - Reducing antibiotic use in intensive care units by even small amounts can significantly decrease transmission of dangerous multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs), according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Researchers developed models to demonstrate the impact of reducing antibiotics by 10% and by 25%, and found corresponding reductions in spread of the deadly bacteria of 11.2 percent and 28.3 percent, respectively."Antibiotic exposure is the most significant driver of resistance. In the hospital setting, nearly 50 percent of all patients receive an antibiotic, including up to 75 percent of all critically ill patients," said Sean Barnes, Ph.D., As

antibiotic resistance is lurking in the environment

Immunity to a last-resort antibiotic can develop in bacteria that haven’t been exposed to that antibiotic.

new ultrafast method for determining antibiotic resistance

Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method for very rapidly determining whether infection-causing bacteria are resistant or susceptible to antibiotics. The findings have now been published in the US journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).Antibiotic resistance is a growing medical problem that threatens human health globally. One important contributory factor in the development of resistance is the incorrect use of antibiotics for treatment. Reliable methods to quickly and easily identify bacterial resistance patterns (Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing, AST) and provide the proper treatment from the start, i.e. right from the doctor's appointment, are a solution to the problem. This has not been possible because existing antibiotic resistance tests

more than 1,000 'super-superbug' cases in last year

Australia has a new detection system in it's fight against unstoppable bacteria known as super-superbugs. More than a thousand cases of unstoppable "super-superbug" bacteria have been found in Australia in the past year, with experts warning more are on the way.In its first year of operation, Australia's national superbug alert system has detected the new bugs which Professor John Turnidge says are far more dangerous than common multi-resistant bacteria.Prof Turnidge, senior medical advisor to the government's resistance strategy, says the bugs he calls "super-superbugs" are resistant to all last line defence antibiotics and are near untreatable.Their emergence has led to the establishment of the National Alert System for Critical Antimicrobial Resistance or CARAlert to collect and instant

new antibiotic packs a punch against bacterial resistance

LA JOLLA, CA - May 29, 2017 - Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have given new superpowers to a lifesaving antibiotic called vancomycin, an advance that could eliminate the threat of antibiotic-resistant infections for years to come. The researchers, led by Dale Boger, co-chair of TSRI's Department of Chemistry, discovered a way to structurally modify vancomycin to make an already-powerful version of the antibiotic even more potent."Doctors could use this modified form of vancomycin without fear of resistance emerging," said Boger, whose team announced the finding today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.The original form of vancomycin is an ideal starting place for developing better antibiotics. The antibiotic has been prescribed by doctors fo

bacteria from cystic fibrosis patient could help thwart antibiotic-resistant tb

The number of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) cases is rising globally. But a newly discovered natural antibiotic -- produced by bacteria from the lung infection in a cystic fibrosis patient -- could help fight these infections. Lab testing reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society shows that the compound is active against multi-drug resistant strains.
Starting with the famous first discovery of penicillin from mold, scientists have continued to search for natural sources of antibiotics. And as pathogens develop resistance to once-reliable medicines, the search has taken on a new urgency. By 2040, more than a third of all TB cases in Russia, for example, could show resistance to first-line drugs currently used to fight the disease, a recent report published in Lancet estim

new antibiotic packs a punch against bacterial resistance

A colorized scanning electron micrograph of MRSA. Credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesScientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have given new superpowers to a lifesaving antibiotic called vancomycin, an advance that could eliminate the threat of antibiotic-resistant infections for years to come. The researchers, led by Dale Boger, co-chair of TSRI's Department of Chemistry, discovered a way to structurally modify vancomycin to make an already-powerful version of the antibiotic even more potent.
"Doctors could use this modified form of vancomycin without fear of resistance emerging," said Boger, whose team announced the finding today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.The original form of vancomycin is an ideal starting place

wsu looks for practices to thwart antimicrobial resistance

IMAGE: WSU postdoctoral fellow Mark Caudell confers with Maasai research assistants to identify survey households.
view more Credit: Washington State UniversityThe death last year of a woman in Reno, Nev., from an infection resistant to every type of antibiotic available in the U.S. highlights how serious the threat of antimicrobial resistance has become.Washington State University scientists are addressing growing global concern about the spread of antimicrobial resistance in Africa, where the World Health Organization predicts that, by 2050, drug resistant tuberculosis and other bacteria could lead to the deaths of 4.15 million people each year. Their work identifying practices that lead to bacterial transmission could help save African lives and prevent the spread of antibiotic resist

new antibiotic packs a punch against bacterial resistance

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have given new superpowers to a lifesaving antibiotic called vancomycin, an advance that could eliminate the threat of antibiotic-resistant infections for years to come. The researchers, led by Dale Boger, co-chair of TSRI's Department of Chemistry, discovered a way to structurally modify vancomycin to make an already-powerful version of the antibiotic even more potent.

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