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 we won t sell out our mob delegates walk out of constitutional recognition forum in protest
'we won't sell out our mob': delegates walk out of constitutional recognition fo

Breakaway group of delegates walk out of Referendum Council’s Uluru talks, claiming it was a fraught process. A group of delegates have walked out of the national First People’s summit to discuss constitutional recognition stating, “we won't sell out our mob”.At least seven delegates from Victoria and Dubbo along with a large group of supporters walked out  from the Referendum Council’s talks on constitutional recognition, claiming the process was flawed.Speaking to reporters minutes after walking out of the convention hall, Jenny Munro condemned the Referendum Council’s efforts to support Constitutional recognition.“Like native title, it’ll prove to be an abject failure,” she said.She told NITV News the facilitation process had been "disappointing".Victorian delegate, Lydia Thorpe, said h

'we won't sell out our mob': delegates walk out of constitutional recognition fo

A breakaway group of delegates have walked out of the Referendum Council’s Uluru talks, claiming it was a flawed process. A group of delegates have walked out of the national First People’s summit to discuss constitutional recognition stating, “we won't sell out our mob”.At least seven delegates from Victoria and Dubbo, along with a large group of supporters, walked out from the Referendum Council’s talks on constitutional recognition, claiming the process was fraught with danger.Speaking to reporters minutes after walking out of the convention hall, Jenny Munro condemned the Referendum Council’s efforts to support constitutional recognition."It's not a dialogue, it's a one-way conversation. Every time we try and raise an issue our voices are silenced," she said."They are not looking at an

'we won't sell out our mob': delegates walk out of constitutional recognition fo

A breakaway group of delegates have walked out of the Referendum Council’s Uluru talks, claiming it was a flawed process. A group of delegates have walked out of the national First People’s summit to discuss constitutional recognition stating, “we won't sell out our mob”.At least seven delegates from Victoria and Dubbo, along with a large group of supporters, walked out from the Referendum Council’s talks on constitutional recognition, claiming the process was fraught with danger.Speaking to reporters minutes after walking out of the convention hall, Jenny Munro condemned the Referendum Council’s efforts to support constitutional recognition."It's not a dialogue, it's a one-way conversation. Every time we try and raise an issue our voices are silenced," she said."They are not looking at an

'we won't sell out our mob': delegates walk out of constitutional recognition fo

A breakaway group of delegates have walked out of the Referendum Council’s Uluru talks, claiming it was a flawed process. A group of delegates have walked out of the national First People’s summit to discuss constitutional recognition stating, “we won't sell out our mob”.At least seven delegates from Victoria and Dubbo, along with a large group of supporters, walked out from the Referendum Council’s talks on constitutional recognition, claiming the process was fraught with danger.Speaking to reporters minutes after walking out of the convention hall, Jenny Munro condemned the Referendum Council’s efforts to support constitutional recognition."It's not a dialogue, it's a one-way conversation. Every time we try and raise an issue our voices are silenced," she said."They are not looking at an

'we won't sell out our mob': delegates walk out of constitutional recognition fo

A breakaway group of delegates have walked out of the Referendum Council’s Uluru talks, claiming it was a flawed process. A group of delegates have walked out of the national First People’s summit to discuss constitutional recognition stating, “we won't sell out our mob”.At least seven delegates from Victoria and Dubbo, along with a large group of supporters, walked out from the Referendum Council’s talks on constitutional recognition, claiming the process was fraught with danger.Speaking to reporters minutes after walking out of the convention hall, Jenny Munro condemned the Referendum Council’s efforts to support constitutional recognition."It's not a dialogue, it's a one-way conversation. Every time we try and raise an issue our voices are silenced," she said."They are not looking at an

convention set to agree on indigenous recognition, despite walkout

Australia's first Indigenous constitutional convention is set to agree on a pathway to constitutional recognition and negotiating a treaty or treaties, despite a fiery walkout by seven delegates from Victoria and NSW on Thursday.Nine charged over $165m ATO fraudVideo duration02:53Previous slideNext slideVideo duration01:03Uluru Summit: Indigenous groups gather to ...Uluru Summit: Indigenous groups gather to discuss constitutional recognitionHundreds of Indigenous people from across the country are at Uluru to discuss whether they want to be recognised in the constitutionNine charged over $165m ATO fraudVideo duration02:53Video duration02:53Nine charged over $165m ATO fraudNine charged over $165m ATO fraudOne of those to be charged is the son of the Australian Taxation Office Deputy Commiss

uluru convention set to agree on indigenous recognition, despite walkout

Australia's first Indigenous constitutional convention is set to agree on a pathway to constitutional recognition and negotiating a treaty or treaties, despite a fiery walkout by seven delegates from Victoria and NSW on Thursday.Nine charged over $165m ATO fraudVideo duration02:53Previous slideNext slideVideo duration01:03Uluru Summit: Indigenous groups gather to ...Uluru Summit: Indigenous groups gather to discuss constitutional recognitionHundreds of Indigenous people from across the country are at Uluru to discuss whether they want to be recognised in the constitutionNine charged over $165m ATO fraudVideo duration02:53Video duration02:53Nine charged over $165m ATO fraudNine charged over $165m ATO fraudOne of those to be charged is the son of the Australian Taxation Office Deputy Commiss

uluru convention set to agree on indigenous recognition, despite walkout

Australia's first Indigenous constitutional convention is set to agree on a pathway to constitutional recognition and negotiating a treaty or treaties, despite a fiery walkout by seven delegates from Victoria and NSW on Thursday.Nine charged over $165m ATO fraudVideo duration02:53Previous slideNext slideVideo duration01:03Uluru Summit: Indigenous groups gather to ...Uluru Summit: Indigenous groups gather to discuss constitutional recognitionHundreds of Indigenous people from across the country are at Uluru to discuss whether they want to be recognised in the constitutionNine charged over $165m ATO fraudVideo duration02:53Video duration02:53Nine charged over $165m ATO fraudNine charged over $165m ATO fraudOne of those to be charged is the son of the Australian Taxation Office Deputy Commiss

exclusive: shorten ‘hopes for consensus’ at uluru convention

Opposition Leader sees road to treaties through constitutional recognition. The Opposition Leader says Indigenous Australians will play a crucial role in the next few days in determining the country’s next referendum.Hundreds of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are meeting at Uluru in Central Australia to discuss the way forward on recognising Indigenous people in Australia’s Constitution.“I hope they get consensus but if they don't get consensus it's not the end of the road,” Opposition Leader Bill Shorten told NITV in an exclusive interview.“I don’t assume across four days that everyone will agree with each other.”"(But) I’m not pessimistic at all, I think this is part of a process."Asked if he was not attending the forum because he was not prioritizing Indigenous Affairs, Shorten

exclusive: shorten ‘hopes for consensus’ at uluru convention

Opposition Leader sees road to treaties through constitutional recognition. The Opposition Leader says Indigenous Australians will play a crucial role in the next few days in determining the country’s next referendum.Hundreds of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are meeting at Uluru in Central Australia to discuss the way forward on recognising Indigenous people in Australia’s Constitution.“I hope they get consensus but if they don't get consensus it's not the end of the road,” Opposition Leader Bill Shorten told NITV in an exclusive interview.“I don’t assume across four days that everyone will agree with each other.”"(But) I’m not pessimistic at all, I think this is part of a process."Asked if he was not attending the forum because he was not prioritizing Indigenous Affairs, Shorten

exclusive: shorten ‘hopes for consensus’ at uluru convention

Opposition Leader sees road to treaties through constitutional recognition. The Opposition Leader says Indigenous Australians will play a crucial role in the next few days in determining the country’s next referendum.Hundreds of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are meeting at Uluru in Central Australia to discuss the way forward on recognising Indigenous people in Australia’s Constitution.“I hope they get consensus but if they don't get consensus it's not the end of the road,” Opposition Leader Bill Shorten told NITV in an exclusive interview.“I don’t assume across four days that everyone will agree with each other.”"(But) I’m not pessimistic at all, I think this is part of a process."Asked if he was not attending the forum because he was not prioritizing Indigenous Affairs, Shorten

exclusive: shorten ‘hopes for consensus’ at uluru convention

Opposition Leader sees road to treaties through constitutional recognition. The Opposition Leader says Indigenous Australians will play a crucial role in the next few days in determining the country’s next referendum.Hundreds of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are meeting at Uluru in Central Australia to discuss the way forward on recognising Indigenous people in Australia’s Constitution.“I hope they get consensus but if they don't get consensus it's not the end of the road,” Opposition Leader Bill Shorten told NITV in an exclusive interview.“I don’t assume across four days that everyone will agree with each other.”"(But) I’m not pessimistic at all, I think this is part of a process."Asked if he was not attending the forum because he was not prioritizing Indigenous Affairs, Shorten

exclusive: shorten ‘hopes for consensus’ at uluru convention

Opposition Leader sees road to treaties through constitutional recognition. The Opposition Leader says Indigenous Australians will play a crucial role in the next few days in determining the country’s next referendum.Hundreds of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are meeting at Uluru in Central Australia to discuss the way forward on recognising Indigenous people in Australia’s Constitution.“I hope they get consensus but if they don't get consensus it's not the end of the road,” Opposition Leader Bill Shorten told NITV in an exclusive interview.“I don’t assume across four days that everyone will agree with each other.”"(But) I’m not pessimistic at all, I think this is part of a process."Asked if he was not attending the forum because he was not prioritizing Indigenous Affairs, Shorten

rejection of constitutional recognition raises questions over recognise campaign

The Recognise campaign may need a rebrand after Aboriginal Australia abandoned constitutional recognition in favour of a voice in parliament and a treaty. Aboriginal Australia's rejection of constitutional recognition in favour of an elected parliamentary advisory body and a treaty has raised serious questions over the future of the Recognise campaign.A major rebranding may be needed for the government-sponsored marketing campaign that has received millions of dollars in funding since 2012 to build community support for the cause.On Friday hundreds of indigenous leaders at Uluru abandoned the prospect of a symbolic statement of acknowledgement recognising Aboriginal people as the original owners of the land.RELATED:50 years on, 1967 referendum campaigner mentors next generationAunty Shirle

rejection of constitutional recognition raises questions over recognise campaign

The Recognise campaign may need a rebrand after Aboriginal Australia abandoned constitutional recognition in favour of a voice in parliament and a treaty. Aboriginal Australia's rejection of constitutional recognition in favour of an elected parliamentary advisory body and a treaty has raised serious questions over the future of the Recognise campaign.A major rebranding may be needed for the government-sponsored marketing campaign that has received millions of dollars in funding since 2012 to build community support for the cause.On Friday hundreds of indigenous leaders at Uluru abandoned the prospect of a symbolic statement of acknowledgement recognising Aboriginal people as the original owners of the land.RELATED:50 years on, 1967 referendum campaigner mentors next generationAunty Shirle

indigenous artistic director stephen page urges action on constitutional recogni

Internationally-acclaimed Indigenous artistic director Stephen Page has told SBS World News we need to stop treating constitutional recognition 'like a cup of coffee'. Stephen Page has worked as the artistic director of Sydney's Bangarra Dance Theatre for 27 years.He said Indigenous Australians owe much to the "contemporary warriors" who fought to have Indigenous people recognised in the 1967 referendum.But 50 years on, he told SBS World News he's frustrated that despite frequent conversations, there's still no change on constitutional recognition."Why are we treating it like a cup of coffee?" he asked."The constant constitutional question, and how it's not acknowledged, how it's not respected, there must be a better way to compensate land and people."Page: "The constant constitutional que

indigenous artistic director stephen page urges action on constitutional recogni

Internationally-acclaimed Indigenous artistic director Stephen Page has told SBS World News we need to stop treating constitutional recognition "like a cup of coffee". Stephen Page has worked as the artistic director of Sydney's Bangarra Dance Theatre for 27 years.He said Indigenous Australians owe much to the "contemporary warriors" who fought to have Indigenous people recognised in the 1967 referendum.But 50 years on, he told SBS World News he's frustrated that despite frequent conversations, there's still no change on constitutional recognition."Why are we treating it like a cup of coffee?" he asked."The constant constitutional question, and how it's not acknowledged, how it's not respected, there must be a better way to compensate land and people."Page: "The constant constitutional que

presstv-syrian delegates discuss constitutional technicalities

Homa LezgeePress TV, GenevaDelegates from the Syrian government and foreign-backed opposition discuss constitutional technicalities for a political transition during the 6th round of peace talks in the Swiss city of Geneva. The 2 sides have held separate talks with the UN mediator Staffan de Mistura though hopes for a breakthrough are dim.

constitutional recognition profoundly important for all of us

One of the first questions Indigenous people ask each other when we meet for the first time is, "who's your mob?"In 1788, there were hundreds of distinct societies across Australia, each with their own unique language, traditions, kinship systems and governance. They had trading routes and methods for navigating over long distances. They modified and intervened in the environment to improve food sources and availability. They had complex kinship systems defining both personal and civic rights and responsibilities. And each group knew what was their country and what was the country of another group.
Warren Mundine has posed a way forward for Indigenous recognition. Photo: Pat ScalaThe pathway to constitutional recognition holds profound importance for today's Australian nation and for all

how to sell your apple watch

What's the best way to sell your old Apple Watch before upgrading otherwise moving on? Here are your options!If you're looking to upgrade to a new Apple Watch Series, switch between aluminum, stainless steel, or edition, or simply aren't using your Watch anymore and want to find it a new home, sell it can help you earn back some cash. While there aren't as many places to sell your old Apple Watch as there is your old iPhone, there are still a few worth checking out.When should you sell?Normally I advise people to sell just before a new version gets released. That way the market isn't flooded and prices haven't gone down. Apple Watch is only on its second series, though, which makes it hard to predict when the third will arrive.The original Apple Watch debuted in the spring. The second in t

all in a day at estimates

George Brandis, Attorney-General, was trying valiantly to avoid casting indelicate reflection on Donald Trump, blabber of secrets, and his reliability as a recipient of Australian security intelligence.Nine charged over $165m ATO fraudVideo duration02:53Previous slideNext slideVideo duration03:03The eight best moments in Senate estimatesThe eight best moments in Senate estimatesPipe bombs, bee semen and frustrated outbursts: just another day in Senate estimates.Nine charged over $165m ATO fraudVideo duration02:53Video duration02:53Nine charged over $165m ATO fraudNine charged over $165m ATO fraudOne of those to be charged is the son of the Australian Taxation Office Deputy Commissioner Michael Cranston, who will appear in court.Constitutional recognition: Indigenous groups gather at UluruV

state interests trump human rights, says chair of russia’s constitutional court

Protecting human rights should not create a threat to state
sovereignty, undermine “the moral standards of the society” or “disrupt its
religious identity,” Valery Zorkin, chief justice of Russia’s Constitutional
Court, said Thursday at the St. Petersburg International Law Forum. Zorkin argued that defending the rights of the majority is
equally as important as defending the rights of various minority groups. “Some
2016 events - like Brexit for example - have demonstrated that the concept of
defending the rights of the majority, lately ignored by Western societies, is
important,” the Constitutional Court's chief justice was quoted as saying by the
Interfax news agency."If the society
is unhealthy and immoral, it can’t fully protect human rights,” he
said. 

indigenous treaty process won't be easy: turnbull

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has warned 'controversial' changes to the constitution have little hope of succeeding after Indigenous leaders called for a treaty instead of 'symbolic' constitutional acknowledgement. On Friday, hundreds of Indigenous leaders at Uluru abandoned the prospect of a statement of acknowledgement in the constitution recognising Aboriginal people as the original owners of the land.Instead, they decided to push for a constitutionally elected Indigenous body in federal parliament, a mechanism for treaty making and a healing commission."In 1967 we were counted, in 2017 we seek to be heard," Indigenous leaders at the Referendum Council summit in Uluru said on Friday.Mr Turnbull told the National Reconciliation Week lunch in Melbourne to mark the 50th anniversary of th

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“I so often hear the idiom walk the talk corrupted to talk the walk or walk the walk or some other horrid variation that even I am becoming confused as to the correct usage,” writes Steve of Killara.

presstv-iran vows full throttle aid to china's silk road

Iran says it is fully on board to help revive Silk Road, an ancient trade route for a thousand years which China plans to expand between Asia, Africa and Europe. Leaders from 29 countries and ministers and top officials from many others will gather in Beijing for a two-day summit starting on Sunday to map out development of the "Belt and Road" initiative.Delegates are about to discuss the plan which involves hundreds of billions of dollars over the coming decades, underpinned by building ports, railways and power links across Asia and on to Europe.Iranian Minister of Economic Affairs and Finance Ali Tayebnia arrived in the Chinese capital on Saturday to represent the country at the forum, IRNA news agency reported.Iranian Minister of Economic Affairs and Finance Ali Tayebnia “Iran will emp

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